Why would a dermatologist advertise? Department stores, big-box discount stores, and retail stores of any variety advertise in order to sell more of their wares, the things on their shelves and in their aisles. Then they can make a greater profit, and increase the return on investment for their owners or their stockholders. Sometimes advertising serves the important purpose of notifying the public of a product or service that would benefit them, but about which they are otherwise unaware. And here is where dermatologists come in. We aren't saying there is anything bad or immoral about dermatologists' advertising, but we can't get away from the fact that it does engender some controversy. 

So if there is nothing specifically bad or immoral about advertising for a dermatologist's services, why then, has it become such a controversial topic in the world of medicine, especially in the dermatology specialty? To answer this question, it's necessary to distinguish advertising from marketing. 

Advertising in paid for and explicitly promotes the services of the physician. Aspects of marketing may be paid for as well, but it can take a far more subtle direction, and is in fact done every time a physician provides excellent care to his or her patients. We all know from experience that the best marketing is word-of-mouth and results from taking care of patients in the best way possible. Word-of-mouth, which cannot be purchased for any amount of money, has been proven to build practices far more successfully than internet ads, social media, and direct mail. Those physicians who have built successful practices over time by being good doctors, listening to their patients, and employing staff that are helpful and sensitive to patient needs, can dance circles around the physicians who must advertise to build his or her practice. Those who have trouble developing strong patient relationship and related referral base inevitably must turn to more mass-market approaches. And what is a better example of that than advertising, with its tendency to be inaccurate and promise results that we all know are so often unachievable. Just think about it: if patients aren't telling people what a great practice it is that they're going to why would people believe that  practice's own advertisements?

 

 

Who We Are

 

     "Do the right thing". Such is the mantra of the dermatology group, Clear Complexions, Rx Ltd., located in Schaumburg, IL, one mile west of the Woodfield Mall. Founded by an eminent dermatologist, Dr. James Fulton, in the 1970s, there are many in the Chicagoland population who still remember us by our predecessor company and its long-time "Face Up" name. Long renown for the treatment of acne, Clear Complexions Rx has a track record of success in the remedy of this condition spanning more than forty years, utilizing medication in conjunction with physical treatment modalities, as spelled out in Dr. Fulton's original principles. (Dr. Fulton's review article on the subject of acne is currently on the highly acclaimed and most frequently physician-viewed website, "Medscape/eMedicine".) We stand against the hyping of gimmicks, slick advertising, and ineffective technology of acne-related products in the absence of hard data or proven results.

 

     For too many people, acne is notable for its frustrating unpredictability. The deeply apprehensive person who states that he or she has "tried everything" and is ready to give up, is also of paramount concern. Some of our patients have been to other dermatology venues with little to show for it. In this regard we welcome all these and any other supposedly "hard-to treat" or frustrated individuals struggling with the problem of acne. 

     

     Clear Complexions Rx also welcomes as patients, and has experience with, a wide range of other dermatology disease conditions. Rosacea, melasma or discoloration, eczema, dermatitis, sun damage (can be severe), scalp and hair conditions, hyperhydrosis (increased sweating), psoriasis, fungal infections, and allergic reactions exemplify these other problems that bring people to the office and to the attention of our physicians, Drs. Q. Jalil, MD and H. Nichamin, MD, M.Sc.

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     Botox and Xeomin continue to excel in popularity with their impressive effects, and while we wait for expert reviews the company is excited about introducing the newest neuromodulator to come to market by the name of Jeuveau. Jeauveau, a neurotoxin that is structurally similar to Botox was recently approved for facial wrinkles and lines by the FDA as a new facial injectable. Initial findings show that Jeauveau potentially outperforms the others in terms of longevity and in the treatment of glabellar frown lines. This new wrinkle/relaxing injectable is very similar to Botox and Xeomin in action and onset. It can be used in any area the others are used, both cosmetic and medical. One of these three may be more beneficial to a specific patient, because of subtle variations like the strain of protein used or the presence of proteins in the formula. Botox and Xeomin use the same strain of botulinum toxin, but Jeuveau uses a different strain. One of the biggest advantages of any of these injectables is their ability to be used both preventatively and therapeutically according to your skin's needs. 

 

Feel free to call our office at 847-843-0200 ahead of time if you wish to check and confirm insurance network participation. Medicare and Medicaid patients are also welcome. 

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705 E. Golf Road, Schaumburg, IL 60173         (847) 843-0200

 

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